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Facebook “Supreme Court” to rule on deleted publications soon

The idea of ​​a supervisory board, a sort of “Supreme Court” made up of independent personalities, had been raised by Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg in April 2018, and was initially due to be set up in late 2019. Dado Ruvic / REUTERS

Facebook announced Tuesday (January 28th) that its “supreme court” will soon be operational. The idea of ​​a supervisory board made up of independent figures had been raised by Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg in April 2018, and was initially due to be put in place in late 2019.

Facebook had published in September its charter for this committee. The statutes, published on Tuesday, give the public a period of fifteen days to send them a complaint concerning the publications deleted from Facebook or Instagram, provided they have exhausted all other calls. The committee's decision will be made within 90 days, and Facebook will have to act on it. The body will be chaired by Thomas Hughes, a British human rights activist, former executive director of Article 19, a human rights organization.

“Given the large number of decisions made by Facebook, as well as the time required to study each case, we expect the committee to choose those who are most likely to guide Facebook in its future decisions and policies”, commented on the California social network.

Read also Content moderation: Facebook's “supreme court” will be in place in early 2020

Content deleted then controversial posts

The committee will initially focus on disputes over deleted content, before expanding its action to complaints about controversial posts allowed to stay on the platform, according to Facebook.

The committee will have up to 40 members to review the appeals in a panel led by three co-chairs. The first three co-chairs will be appointed by Facebook, the board of directors and the panel administrators.

The idea of ​​a supervisory board, a sort of “Supreme Court” made up of independent figures, was raised by Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg in April 2018, and was initially due to be put in place in late 2019.

Facebook is stepping up initiatives to restore the confidence of authorities and its users after a series of scandals related to hate content or disinformation campaigns. The social network, used by more than 2 billion people worldwide, seeks to prevent the publication and sharing of articles and images considered inappropriate according to its own charter, while being careful to respect freedom of expression .

He recently confirmed that political advertisements, even false ones, would not be censored, attracting a new round of convictions in the middle of the American presidential campaign.

Article reserved for our subscribers Read also Facebook's dizzying “supreme court” project on content moderation

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