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the best Thunderbolt 3 docks

Produced in the United States, this guide was originally published in English on the Wirecutter website. You can read it here in original version.

After spending more than 25 hours studying and testing 13 Thunderbolt 3 docks ourselves using over $ 7,000 in test equipment, we estimate that NT3 Plus from CalDigit remains the best choice for Mac or PC users who want to hook up multiple displays, USB devices, and high-speed storage. It has more useful ports than most docks, can charge most laptops as quickly as they accept, and takes up little space on your desktop.

The CalDigit TS3 Plus offers the most convenient connector package we've found, starting with two Thunderbolt 3 ports, five USB-A and two USB-C (one USB 3.2 Gen 1 and the other USB 3.2 Gen 2).¹ It also has an SD card slot, a DisplayPort output (HDMI compatible thanks to an inexpensive adapter), a gigabit Ethernet port, audio input and output jacks, as well as a real rarity on these products: an output S / PDIF optics for digital sound. In addition, while most docks are placed horizontally, the TS3 Plus can also be installed vertically to reduce its size. All of Apple's current computers, whether portable or desktop, have Thunderbolt 3 ports, like many newer PCs (including our favorite laptop for professionals). So check if your computer has one! If a more affordable USB-C dock doesn't meet your needs and you want to take advantage of the Thunderbolt 3's higher bandwidth, this CalDigit model offers the best combination of connectivity, intelligent form and compactness that we have found.

Our affordable choice

CalDigit's USB-C Pro

Compatible with more computers

This USB-C dock does not have a second Thunderbolt port unlike the TS3 Plus, and it offers fewer USB ports. But it works just as well with computers with USB-C as with those with Thunderbolt 3.

* At the time of publication, the price was € 209.99

The CalDigit USB-C Pro dock is less expensive than the TS3 Plus, while offering the main functions of the latter. It is also designed to work with computers that only have USB-C, which makes it a good choice if you are looking for a dock compatible with various computers. It has fewer USB ports (three USB-A and one USB-C), but has an SD card reader, two DisplayPort outputs, an Ethernet port and a sound jack. It supports the same power supply: 85 watts. If you don't have a second Thunderbolt 3 port, you can't chain Thunderbolt devices. It is also bigger than the TS3 Plus, but at this price, we forgive these sacrifices.

Besides its very ordinary three USB-A ports, the HP Thunderbolt Dock 120W G2 incorporates a second USB-C port, which makes it more practical if you have modern accessories and do not connect many older devices at the same time. It also has two DisplayPort outputs to connect two screens without occupying the Thunderbolt 3 port. We appreciate its compact cube shape and its low price.

Our selection of the best Thunderbolt 3 docks

The complete guide

Why trust us ?

I managed the Accessories section ofiLounge for over three years, and I've been covering accessories for Wirecutter. During these periods, I tested more than a thousand products for iOS and Mac, including many docking stations and docks in the updates of this guide.

Who needs a Thunderbolt 3 dock?

If your computer has a Thunderbolt 3 port and you want to connect multiple devices (screens, hard drives, printers, etc.) to it, the Thunderbolt dock lets you connect them all with one cable. If you use a laptop as your main computer and move it regularly, you can leave all your devices connected to the dock on your desk: when you get there, you just have to connect it to your laptop for that everything is immediately connected.

A Thunderbolt dock is also handy if your compatible computer lacks ports and connectivity, or if the sockets are in the wrong place. You can use a single cable from the computer to the dock and place it in a more accessible location.

Thunderbolt docks are ideal for people working in the creative world and anyone who demands the most from their computer, including the highest data rates and the widest choice of ports. However, for most people, a much cheaper USB-C dock will be just as effective. It uses the same outlet and can do almost the same thing, but its speeds are lower than those of Thunderbolt 3 models and it generally offers fewer or less varied ports.

If you have an older Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 compatible computer (which uses the Mini-DisplayPort instead of USB-C), you can purchase a Thunderbolt 2 dock (comparative in English). If, however, you plan to replace it in the future, you may want to take a Thunderbolt 3 dock plugged into Apple's Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter. Throughput will logically be limited to Thunderbolt 2 and the power and video outputs will be inactive, but you won't have to buy a dock by switching computers.

USB type-C vs Thunderbolt 3

Although USB-C and Thunderbolt 3 use the same jack, it's not the same thing. The Thunderbolt 3 does everything that USB-C does, but adds some exclusive possibilities. Specifically, the Thunderbolt 3 offers higher throughput, up to 40 Gbps versus a maximum of 5 or 10 Gbps for USB-C. It allows data transfer in both directions at the same time, which is useful when passing multiple services over the same cable, and can thus transmit data, video signals and power simultaneously. It is also possible to connect Thunderbolt equipment in series on the same cable.

In general, we appreciate the reduction in the number of different takes. However, this can become confusing when the same connector offers different functions depending on the computer. You won't damage anything by plugging a Thunderbolt 3 device into a USB-C port, but it won't necessarily work as it should: so check your computer's user manual to see which standard it uses. Thunderbolt costs manufacturers more; you will therefore find it mainly on recent Macs (with the exception of 12-inch MacBooks) and on high-end PCs like our favorite professional laptops. If your computer uses USB-C but is not compatible with Thunderbolt 3, this article will be useless: check out our guide to USB-C hubs and docks instead.

Our selection and testing method

Some of the Thunderbolt docks we tested, alongside their power supplies.
Some of the Thunderbolt docks we tested, alongside their power supplies. WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL HESSION

A good Thunderbolt dock expands the possibilities of the computer to which it is connected, providing additional connections at the maximum possible throughput. They are particularly useful for computers with few or few ports, like the current one 13-inch MacBook Pro, limited to two Thunderbolt ports; but they can also simplify the connection of peripherals to a computer, laptop or desktop. To evaluate the products, we checked the following characteristics:

  • Choice of ports: In general, the more sockets, the better, but we particularly appreciate the useful ports like USB-A and video outputs. Less common ones, like FireWire and eSATA, are nice, but not essential.
  • Port performance: equipment plugged into the Thunderbolt 3 dock should operate almost as if it were connected directly to the computer. We will see below our test procedure for each type of socket.
  • Design and dimensions: all other things being equal, a more compact dock is more practical than a large model. We also prefer those that can stand up to reduce the clutter of the desk.
Most docks are designed to sit horizontally with the majority of the ports facing back, but some models (like our favorite from CalDigit, here at the top) can stand up to save space.
Most docks are designed to sit horizontally with the majority of the ports facing back, but some models (like our favorite from CalDigit, here at the top) can stand up to save space. WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH

Thunderbolt docks have always been a niche market; you will therefore find few different models. We have tested almost all of those released since June 2017. Each time, we used a 13-inch MacBook Pro from 2017 equipped with the Touch Bar to test the speeds. For the models tested in 2018, we also checked the compatibility with a Dell XPS 13 laptop. In particular, we performed the following tests:

  • USB-A: we used AJA System Test to measure flow rates using a Samsung T3 portable SSD. To measure the capacity of the docks to charge other equipment, we plugged in a 10.5-inch iPad Pro and read the power supplied using PortaPow's USB Power Monitor.
  • Thunderbolt 3: we used AJA System Test to measure throughputs using a LaCie Bolt 3. In order to measure loading speed, we read the system report results from a 13 inch MacBook Pro and compared them to the measurements a Satechi USB-C Power Meter.
  • USB-C: we used AJA System Test and the Samsung T3 SSD. To measure the power supply, we connected a Drok USB Load Tester then mounted the amperage of it as far as possible without overloading the dock: recording the voltage and the intensity allowed us to calculate the power (in watts).
  • HDMI: we connected each dock via HDMI to a 27-inch 4K monitor BenQ BL2711U, with the definition set to 4K; then we repeated this test using a Mini-DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable running from the Thunderbolt port of the dock to the monitor.
  • DisplayPort / Mini DisplayPort: we connected each dock in DisplayPort to a Dell 4K monitor (article in English) or to a LG 27MU88-W, the definition being set to 4K, and we used Blur Busters Motion Tests to check the refresh rate.
  • audio: we tested the sound inputs and outputs of each dock by plugging a headset into each jack, checking that the correct input or output was enabled in macOS, and recording the resulting audio levels.
  • FireWire: we plugged in an SSD version of the OWC Mercury Elite Pro Mini and we measured the flow rates using AJA System Test.
  • Ethernet: we checked the connection speed on a Mac, which displays the link speed.
  • SD card : we used AJA System Test on a SanDisk 64 GB Extreme Pro card.

The best Thunderbolt 3 dock: CalDigit's TS3 Plus

WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH

The NT3 Plus from CalDigit is the best Thunderbolt 3 dock for most users. Indeed, it offers more USB-A ports than almost all of its competitors and it integrates USB-C ports and an SD card reader without sacrificing other important inputs. It is also one of the most compact models on the market, so it takes up less space on your desk, especially if you install it vertically, which is impossible for most competitors. It can also transmit up to 85 W to a laptop, allowing it to charge a 15-inch MacBook Pro at maximum power and a 16-inch model at near-ceiling speed. The TS3 Plus is more expensive than other models, but if you really need a Thunderbolt dock rather than a simple USB-C, this is the model that imposes the least compromise.

Starting from the right, the front of the CalDigit integrates: a USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, a USB-C 3.2 Gen 1, a sound input, a sound output and an SD card reader.
Starting from the right, the front of the CalDigit integrates: a USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, a USB-C 3.2 Gen 1, a sound input, a sound output and an SD card reader. WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH
The back of the CalDigit dock offers two Thunderbolt 3 ports, as well as four USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, one USB-C 3.2 Gen 2, gigabit Ethernet, S / PDIF sound output and a DisplayPort.
The back of the CalDigit dock offers two Thunderbolt 3 ports, as well as four USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, one USB-C 3.2 Gen 2, gigabit Ethernet, S / PDIF sound output and a DisplayPort. WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH

The TS3 Plus provides two Thunderbolt 3 ports, five conventional USB (USB 3.2 Gen 1 type A), an SD reader, a DisplayPort, a gigabit Ethernet, separate jacks for sound input and output, S / digital audio output PDIF, and two USB-C one of which (the one on the back) manages the higher USB 3.2 Gen 2 speeds.

During our tests in USB-A using the Samsung T3 portable SSD, we measured an average speed of 340 MB / s read and 264 MB / s write, on four of the five ports. These speeds are 20 to 30% lower than those obtained by connecting the drive directly to the Mac. However, the other docks tested provided similar results. The fifth port, located lowest on the back of the dock, was faster: 422.7 MB / s read and 383 MB / s write. As for USB-C, the one on the front (Gen 1) offered speeds almost identical to the four slow USB-A, while the back Gen 2 aligned with the fastest USB-A port.

We also measured transfers with a SanDisk Extreme 900 Portable SSD, provided by CalDigit and which we returned after testing. SanDisk announces that this disk can reach 850 MB / s in read as in write (against 450 MB / s for the Samsung T3). The USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports cannot take advantage of this speed: they cap at best at 5 Gbps, or 625 MB / s. However, the USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports, which reach 10 Gbps, can. We saw a slight improvement on the USB-A, at 347 MB ​​/ s in read and 309.7 MB / s in write, and the lowest port was once again significantly faster at 419.3 MB / s in read and 373.7 MB / s write. The difference between the two USB-C was striking: the slowest, on the front, reached 351 MB / s in reading and 313.3 MB / s in writing on average; the backend (Gen 2) was almost twice as fast, with 736.3 MB / s read and 605.7 MB / s write. We obtained even higher data rates by plugging the disk via its USB-C cable directly into the free Thunderbolt port of the dock: 829.7 MB / s in read and 734.3 MB / s in write. All this to say that the TS3 Plus manages high throughputs when combined with suitable equipment.

The TS3 Plus is one of the most compact docks on the market, which limits its size on the desk, especially if you place it vertically.

During our tests with the LaCie Bolt 3, a Thunderbolt 3 SSD, the speeds offered by the TS3 Plus were several times higher than those of the USB ports. However, like all competitors, it did not achieve the same speeds as connecting the drive directly to the computer's Thunderbolt port, nor the maximum transfer speed announced by LaCie. By connecting the player directly to the computer, we got an average read speed of 2,229 MB / s (17.83 Gbps); through the TS3 Plus, the speed remained very close, at 2,173 MB / s (or 17.39 Gbps). Read speeds suffered more, going from 953.3 MB / s (7.63 Gbps) in direct connection to 704.7 MB / s (5.64 Gbps) via the dock. Again, these results are comparable to those obtained at other docks, and these figures indicate extremely fast transfers compared to those of most other types of connections. However, don't buy this dock (or any dock) expecting to get the same performance as if you plug the fastest Thunderbolt 3 drives directly into your computer.

The TS3 Plus SD reader offered data rates comparable to all the other models tested: the data was read on average at 88.7 MB / s and written at 77 MB / s. This is slower than the results of a dedicated card reader, measured in our guide on the best SD cards (article in English), but this remains respectable.

Four of the CalDigit dock's USB-A ports provide power of 7.5 W each (1.5 A and 5 V), which is less than the power delivered by a good dedicated USB charger (guide in English) but similar to results from other docks. The fifth port, closest to the edge, is limited to a 2.5 W (0.5 A) power supply: it is therefore more suitable for transferring data than charging a phone or tablet. Unfortunately, there is no label to indicate that this port is less powerful than the others. The two USB-C ports are also limited to a power of 2.5 W.

Most Thunderbolt docks, like this one, use the DisplayPort for video output. We measured the expected refresh rate, 60 Hz, by plugging a 4K monitor into the dock.

Almost all of the models tested are long and flat, designed to sit horizontally on your desk. Conversely, the TS3 Plus can stand up or lie down. It measures 13.2 × 9.9 × 4.1 cm: placed on its narrowest side, it therefore occupies just over 40 cm² of your office, compared to the 171 cm² required by our affordable choice , the CalDigit USB-C Pro (21.4 × 8 cm).

The other tests of the TS3 Plus are very positive, corresponding to our impressions. ” Of all the Thunderbolt 3 docks I've tested so far, CalDigit's TS3 Plus is my new favorite “Wrote Eric Slivka on MacRumors. Jeff Benjamin, of 9to5Mac, indicates that ” the compact design of the TS3 Plus and its total of 15 ports make this recent CalDigit model a very attractive choice for Mac users “. And Mike Wuerthele ofAppleInsider considers him as ” a great choice “.

Cale Hunt, who tested the TS3 Plus for Windows Central, also praises its performance and its versatility: ” with 15 ports, excellent performance and good compactness, the TS3 Plus is more or less the best Thunderbolt 3 dock currently available “.

Non-crippling faults

An editor of Wirecutter using the TS3 Plus with two screens LG 27UK850-W and a 2017 MacBook Pro reported a problem that sometimes one or both monitors do not turn on when the computer resumes from sleep. ” The solution is generally to disconnect and reconnect one or the other of the screens. Sometimes you have to restart. He noticed a similar concern with the headphone jack. We did not experience any of these issues during our testing, but we did see faults on several Thunderbolt 3 docks when two monitors were connected.

A more affordable dock: the USB-C Pro from CalDigit

WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH
Our affordable choice
Compatible with more computers CalDigit's USB-C Pro

CalDigit's USB-C Pro

Compatible with more computers

This USB-C dock does not have a second Thunderbolt port unlike the TS3 Plus, and it offers fewer USB ports. But it works just as well with computers with USB-C as with those with Thunderbolt 3.

* At the time of publication, the price was € 209.99

If you want to take advantage of most of the possibilities NT3 Plus from CalDigit without breaking your piggy bank, think about CalDigit USB-C Pro, more affordable. Its range of ports is more limited but it will suit many users, and it transmits sufficient electrical power to power all 13-inch laptops as well as many larger products. Unlike most Thunderbolt docks, this one also works with computers whose ports only support USB-C, with almost identical performance. This flexibility makes the USB-C Pro dock a good choice if you regularly alternate between multiple computers; but if you only have a USB-C device, you'd better take a real USB-C dock, even less expensive. Regardless of your computer, note that it is not possible to chain Thunderbolt devices to this dock: there is only one port of this type, occupied by the connection to the computer. This model is also a little more bulky than our favorite.

On the front, the CalDigit dock includes a USB-A 3.2 Gen1 port, a USB-C 3.2 Gen 1, an SD card reader, and a jack combining audio input and output.
On the front, the CalDigit dock includes a USB-A 3.2 Gen1 port, a USB-C 3.2 Gen 1, an SD card reader, and a jack combining audio input and output. WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH
The back of the CalDigit dock includes a gigabit Ethernet, two USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, a Thunderbolt 3 / USB-C and two DisplayPort.
The back of the CalDigit dock includes a gigabit Ethernet, two USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, a Thunderbolt 3 / USB-C and two DisplayPort. WIRECUTTER / MICHAEL MURTAUGH

The choice of plugs from the USB-C Pro dock is more limited than that of the TS3 Plus, but remains quite good. It offers a front USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 (supporting speeds of 10 Gbps) and three USB-A at 5 Gbps. You will also find an SD card reader, two DisplayPort outputs, Ethernet and sound, and this model provides the same power supply up to 85 W as its more expensive cousin.

In our tests, the USB-A and USB-C ports of this model proved to be faster than on the TS3 Plus, with writing at around 330 MB / s and reading at around 405 MB / s on the Samsung SSD (we have not tested with the faster SanDisk). On all other tests, the two docks offered similar results. Note that the USB-C Pro integrates two DisplayPort 1.2 outputs: it allowed our 13-inch MacBook Pro to control two 4K screens at their native definition with a refresh rate of 60 Hz. The purely USB-C computers are them , limited to one 4K display at 30 Hz or two Full HD (1080p) at 60 Hz: this is their only limitation compared to machines equipped with a Thunderbolt 3 output.

CalDigit's USB-C Pro is about 7.5 cm wider and 2 cm deeper than the TS3 Plus. Unlike him, he does not stand up. On the other hand, it is like him delivered with a Thunderbolt 3 cable: you will not need to buy one separately.

Less expensive and less rich in USB-A ports: the Thunderbolt 120W G2 from HP

WIRECUTTER / SARAH KOBOS

The CalDigit TS3 Plus is the ideal solution for users looking for a maximum of USB-A ports. If however you don't need as many of these traditional plugs and want to keep costs down, the HP Thunderbolt 120W G2 is a great alternative. Two USB-C ports and two DisplayPort outputs instead of one compensate for the reduction in the number of USB-A and the absence of an SD card reader. In addition, its ability to transmit 100 W power allows this dock to charge any USB-C computer at its maximum power.

The front of the HP dock has a USB-C port and a Thunderbolt 3 cable, difficult to replace. On the side, you will find a jack combining audio input and output and a Kensington lock.
The front of the HP dock has a USB-C port and a Thunderbolt 3 cable, difficult to replace. On the side, you will find a jack combining audio input and output and a Kensington lock. WIRECUTTER / SARAH KOBOS
The back of the HP dock has two USB-A ports, one gigabit Ethernet, one VGA, one USB-C, two DisplayPort and one Thunderbolt 3.
The back of the HP dock has two USB-A ports, a gigabit Ethernet, a VGA, a USB-C, two DisplayPort and a Thunderbolt 3. WIRECUTTER / SARAH KOBOS

The Thunderbolt 120W G2 has three USB-A ports, two USB-C, a Thunderbolt 3, an Ethernet, a VGA, two DisplayPort, an audio jack, a Kensington slot, and 100 W charging. This is the second USB- C which distinguishes this dock from the competition: it is the only reasonably priced model which has a second socket of this type. During our tests, the ports of the HP proved to be slightly faster than those of the TS3 Plus of CalDigit: in USB-A as in USB-C, we obtained on average 339.3 MB / s in writing and 419 MB / s in reading. The second DisplayPort is also worth noting: it is relatively rare and allows you to connect two screens at the same time without having to go through an additional USB-C-DisplayPort adapter (article in English).

The HP Thunderbolt 120W G2 dock, on the left, and the Thunderbolt 120W G2 with Audio. They are the same except for the speaker module, which you can also purchase separately.
The HP Thunderbolt 120W G2 dock, on the left, and the Thunderbolt 120W G2 with Audio. They are the same except for the speaker module, which you can also purchase separately. WIRECUTTER / SARAH KOBOS

Like CalDigit's TS3 Plus, the HP dock takes up relatively little space on your desk: this rounded square of less than 10 cm in side can be installed almost everywhere. Its only significant drawback is the Thunderbolt cable that connects it to the computer. It is difficult to replace: if you damage the cable, you will have to buy the spare part and the replacement kit from HP, then dismantle the underside of the dock to access the port. Note however that its sixty centimeters should be suitable for most installations.

The Thunderbolt 120W G2 also exists with a built-in speaker. According to our tests, it is more powerful than the MacBook Pro speakers, but the sound quality is more muddy. It is suitable for conferences: the user manual includes Skype for Business and Lync 2013. You can also buy the audio module separately and install it on the dock if you later realize that it would be useful to you.

The ones we are waiting for

At CES 2020, Plugable announced its Thunderbolt 3 dual screen dock and USB-C, the TBT3-UDZ. Like CalDigit's USB-C Pro, it connects to Thunderbolt 3 computers as well as those limited to USB-C. It manages two screens connected in DisplayPort or in HDMI (it has two outputs of each type), as well as seven devices connected in USB-A and a 100 watt power supply. It will be available in the spring.

Competition

The Cable Matters Thunderbolt 3 Docking Station 60W and the Promise Technology Thunderbolt 3 Dock TD-300 were our second choices in a previous version of this guide; they are identical to the paint. They are both cheaper than our favorite from CalDigit, while offering the same number of USB-A ports (5) and an SD card reader. However, unlike our favorite, they do not have USB-C ports or S / PDIF output, their more limited power transfer does not allow to recharge a large laptop (such as a MacBook Pro 15 or 16 inches) as quickly, and they use a combined jack for sound input and output. They also use HDMI 2.0 video outputs instead of the DisplayPort; However, it is difficult (although possible) to manage a 4K screen at 60 Hz in HDMI with a Mac.

Like CalDigit's USB-C Pro, the Kensington SD5550T Dual 4K Hybrid Docking Station works just as well with a USB-C computer as it does with a Thunderbolt 3. It is more expensive and, although it has an additional USB-C port, it skips the SD card reader and limits the power supply at 60 watts, which may be too low for heavy use of a 15-inch or larger computer.

Like the HP we selected, the Elgato Thunderbolt 3 Pro has two USB-C ports. It has SD and MicroSD card readers but has only two USB-A sockets and a single DisplayPort output, despite a wider design and a much higher price.

The 14-OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock offers the same ports as our favorite and also has a MicroSD reader. It proved to be just as good as our first choice in testing, but it is much more bulky. The prices of the two models are similar: take the more compact CalDigit, unless the MicroSD reader is important to you.

The Plugable Thunderbolt 3 Docking Station was our old favorite, but it's as expensive as our current second choice and has no SD card reader or USB-C port. Its only advantage is that it comes with a DisplayPort-HDMI adapter, but it usually costs Less than 10 euros ; so we think that for most users, the additional ports and the card reader of our first choice are more important.

The Elgato Thunderbolt 3 dock provides 85W of power, but it only has three USB-A ports and no card reader. Il est également plus cher que nos alternatives et ne tient pas debout, ce qui encombre donc plus le bureau.

The Thunderbolt 3 Express de Belkin n’a que trois ports USB-A est il est plus cher que des modèles mieux équipés.

The Thunderbolt 3 Docking Station de StarTech and Thunderbolt 3 Quantum Docking Station d’Iogear offrent les mêmes ports (USB-C, DisplayPort, Ethernet et audio, mais seulement deux USB-A) avec la même disposition, mais sans alimentation puissante. Ils ne valent pas leur coût, étant donné que des modèles plus complets sont disponibles à des tarifs comparables.

Nous n’avons pas testé le Dual 4K Monitor Thunderbolt 3 Dock de StarTech, qui est plus encombrant que nos favoris, coûte plus cher et ne possède pas de lecteur de carte SD. Il a le même design et la même connectique qu’une version moins coûteuse, mais il gère une alimentation 85 watts et il est livré avec un câble USB-C-DisplayPort en plus du câble Thunderbolt 3. Nous ne pensons pas que le câble supplémentaire justifie cet achat.

Nous avons également décidé de ne pas tester le Thunder3 Dock Pro d’Akitio : à en juger par ses caractéristiques de niche et son prix élevé, nous ne pensons pas qu’il corresponde aux besoins de la plupart des utilisateurs. C’est le seul dock que nous ayons vu qui intègre un lecteur de carte CFast, ce qui peut être utile aux vidéastes et photographes professionnels. De même, il est à notre connaissance le seul à supporter l’Ethernet 10 Gbps, mais la plupart des réseaux domestiques ne gèrent pas cette vitesse : il est donc plus adapté aux périphériques vidéo professionnels. Ces caractéristiques sont intéressantes, mais elles s’accompagnent d’une puissance électrique limitée à 60 W et de seulement trois ports USB 3.2 Gen 1, le tout pour un tarif supérieur à ceux de la plupart des concurrents.

Notes

  1. Les fabricants annoncent que certains de leurs produits utilisent l’USB 3.1 ou revendiquent l’USB 3.2 sur d’autres, mais ces indications sont en fait interchangeables : le groupe qui gère les spécifications de l’USB a établi un standard de nommage inutilement confus. « Gen 1 » signifie toujours que le débit peut atteindre 5 Gbps, et « Gen 2 » correspond à un débit maximal de 10 Gbps, que le port soit considéré comme un USB 3.1 ou 3.2. Revenir au texte.

Sources

  1. Jason Ziller, Thunderbolt™ 3 – The USB-C That Does It All, Intel, 1e juin 2015

  2. Eric Slivka, Review : CalDigit’s’TS3 Plus’Dock Gives You 15 Ports, 85W Charging, and an SD Card Reader for $250, MacRumors, 30 janvier 2018

  3. Jeff Benjamin, Hands-on : CalDigit TS3 Plus – the best Thunderbolt 3 dock for Mac ?, 9to5Mac, 8 février 2018

  4. Mike Wuerthele, Hands on : $249 CalDigit Thunderbolt Station 3 Plus is a great port expander for new MacBook Pro owners, AppleInsider, 30 janvier 2018

  5. Cale Hunt, CalDigit TS3 Plus Thunderbolt 3 dock is about as good as it gets, Windows Central, 16 avril 2018

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